The 7 M’s: Marrying Your Wedding Vows And Your Sales Pitch (Infographic)

In one way or another, we are all in sales. Crafting a sales message, when done right, can resemble a great marriage. The parallels run deep. For those of us who are married, remember, your foremost customer in life is your very own spouse. Make him or her happy each and every day by delivering the goods you promised in your vows (a sales pitch by another name, if you think about it). In marriage, just as in sales, we benefit from a daily re-commitment to our values. Marriage involves two becoming one. A salesman’s relationship with his customer, at its best, will be very similar. As salespeople, we must listen to our customers, build trust by focusing on what they need to be successful, and aiding in the decision process that should improve the financial standing of everybody involved (not just ourselves). All of these sales elements (and more) are equally important in maintaining a successful, glowing marriage. This infographic is a quick rundown of the seven biggest lessons I’ve learned from my marriage that I have also applied to my business. They all revolve around the idea that we want must build our relationships to last, both in our personal and professional lives. Click here for my original post on the subject: 7 Reasons Why My Horrible Marriage Led To A Great Business! ...

Is Your Company Self-Sabotaging Your Sales?

A recent study, by marketing research firm CSO Insights, revealed, “The top challenge in sales organizations today is that 90% of sales leaders believe that representatives have missed opportunities because of information overload.” The study shows that salespeople are missing opportunities to close sales because they are overloaded with information from their own companies. Unfortunately, information overload is a problem of epidemic proportion. Why? The Challenge For Sales Organizations In this information age we have instant and constant access to information. It is extremely easy to create (email, PDFs, newsletters) and disseminate (email, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube) information, which produces information overload. Too much information always leads to confused prospects, and confused prospects rarely buy. The original challenge for sales organizations was to quickly and easily create and disseminate information to market to the masses. Not only has this been accomplished, but it has also been grossly overdone. Now the challenge for sales organizations has become to refine that information and only share what is specifically relevant to a prospect’s problem. Unsurprisingly, this is VERY difficult to do because we all have a passionate love affair with our own products and services. Two Fundamental Problems From Information Overload Here are two fundamental problems created from when people have too much information: The sales person is often confused because he/she has access to too much information and attempts to communicate most of it to the prospect. As a result, the communication usually lacks structure, brevity, and clarity…all critical components of effective communication. The prospect is confused because scientific research proves that humans simply cannot process excess information, especially if it is not logically structured, takes too long, or is unclear. 2 Questions To Ask About Your Salesperson If your salesperson is overloaded with information, do they have the necessary skills to both refine and communicate information to prospects with clarity and brevity? Are they able to identify what is most important to the prospect and present a strong, unique solution that will meet their greatest need? It takes tremendous skill to communicate with clarity and brevity since these are skills that are taught, not caught. Therefore, a salesperson must not only know their product or service inside and out, but they must also know how to make a prospect understand how their product or service will solve a real problem, using the LEAST amount of information possible. A savvy salesperson will know how to help a customer buy, by only sharing information that is relevant to that conversation. Prospects no longer want to be told how great a product is, they want to know that their greatest need is understood, and a viable solution exists to resolve it. The 4 C’s of Excellent Communicators If you believe, like 90% of sales leaders, that your salespeople may have missed opportunities because of information overload, provide an opportunity for them to learn to become excellent communicators. Forbes Magazine says, “Communication skills are what get you promoted,” and after my 20 years of global experience, I would add that they also impact a company’s overall sales. ...