The Art And Science Of Selling (Part 2)

Welcome to the second part of our series, breaking down the lessons from The Ultimate Sales Messaging System business eBook. This system is designed to teach exceptional communication skills to improve selling technique. It encompasses both the art and science behind crafting the perfect sales pitch. Enjoy! For so many, communication skills can be a roadblock, when they really should be the thing that helps us clinch the deal. Developing exceptional communication skills takes practice, a deep understanding of your audience, and a commitment to using the latest scientific and artistic principles to deliver the message. Read on to find out how. Be clear, concise, and compelling. Stop confusing your prospects, because confused prospects rarely buy. When we can know our audience intimately, have a basic understanding of the adult learning process, and design our message and delivery to create a confident purchasing environment, we can remove the potential barrier of a confused prospect. When communicating the details and capabilities of your products to your customers, you must be able to answer when the prospect asks: “How can this product help me make more money or get rid of my problem?” Clearly, it helps when we can offer a solution our customers can believe in framed within the concept of Return on Investment (ROI). Now, on to Part 2. Follow these 6 Principles so your prospects can do two things… Believe and Buy. 1. The Process Of Filtration The less you talk, the more you’re listened to. -Abigail Van Buren We live in an age of media overload and “too much information” (TMI). As both consumers and presenters, we must learn to filter out excess information and focus on what’s really important. Excess quantity of information negatively impacts the quality of learning. In this case, less truly is more. We call it “filter failure” when we allow our message to be diluted by information that does not build directly upon our main idea. Don’t be guilty of aggravated assault with a wordy weapon! 2. A Little Self-Control Filter failure comes in many forms. Here are some of the most common ways that we allow our words to overwhelm our audience: Add-Ons (adding extra facts just because you want to) Stories (KISS – Keep It Short, Speaker!) Long Introductions (remember the value of a minute) Lack Of Preparation (flow-killers like run-ons, fill-ins, start-overs) Loving Your Own Information (help your audience, don’t be precious) We must get these common problems under control. Our access to technology makes it easy to create and disseminate information, which leads to information overload. It’s so easy to throw a ton of info into a Power Point that it actually tends to do both the speaker and audience a disservice. We need to be better than the technology, and not use it as a crutch. Technology is so much fun, but we can drown in our technology. The fog of information can drown out knowledge.” -Daniel J. Boorstin Don’t drown out information. If you know how to avoid that, you will build trust with your audience, who will then appreciate that you know how to speak their language and solve their problems without overwhelming them. 3. The Power of Clarity Simplicity leads to CLARITY and clarity unleashes the true POWER of effective communication.” It isn’t always easy to employ both clarity and simplicity, which means it’s all the more vital to make the effort. For starters, try to avoid these typical traps: Cultural Cliches (avoid catchphrases that people from other backgrounds might not understand) Meandering Message (ensure a logical flow of ideas in your messaging) Aggravating Acronyms (never use an acronym without defining it, even common ones like “AKA”) Cute Or Crazy (avoid undermining your own credibility; something you might think is cute may look crazy to your audience) 4. The Curse Of Knowledge The curse of knowledge is a problem that leads to “mutual mystification,” a force that derails sales conversations on a daily basis. The “curse” is that, when we know something, we often feel compelled to explain or share it with others in a way that they are not prepared for. This leads to confusion, and confused customers rarely buy. These two solutions can help to alleviate the burden of knowledge: Use quotes and imagery to underscore your point, while giving your audience a chance to digest what you’ve told them so far. Speak their language by using common, everyday examples that can more clearly explain an overly technical idea. Every new idea must build on ideas that the student already knows. -Daniel T. Willingham As tempting as it is to add new information, exceptional communicators who focus on simplicity have the advantage of building rapport with their audience. 5. Stickiness (according to the book, “Made To Stick”) Six key elements of creating a “sticky” message: 1. Simplicity We’ve been over this, but remember; the human brain is wired to retain a certain number of information chunks. This is why phone numbers have 7 digits (excluding the area code). If you are breaking your presentation into chunks, keep this in mind. People are pretty good about remembering 3 or fewer chunks, but when you inch closer to the magical number of 7, or even beyond that (Heaven forbid), you’re really playing with fire and run the risk of overwhelming the audience. 2. Unexpectedness To maintain the interest of your audience without overwhelming them, give your material a degree of mystery or suspense to “keep the butts in the seats.” Be deliberate in how you establish and then build on new ideas. 3. Concreteness Avoid ambiguities and stick to more concrete examples that are easier for everybody to understand. 4. Credibility An obstacle that just comes with the territory is that customers almost always see sales messages as having strings attached. They are right, which is why it is important to cite impartial sources and statistics whenever it makes sense to do so. The message means more when it’s coming from someone who isn’t trying to sell you something. 5. Emotion Make your audience feel something. Emotion will mean different things in different scenarios. Depending on your product or service, crafting a presentation that stokes a sense of compassion, energy, sadness, joy, fear, anger, elation, etc. will help your message to stick. 6. Stories The Harvard Business Review asserts that tossing out the Power Point in favor of a more convincing story is a better way of engaging on a deeper level. People connect better with stories than they do with data in a vacuum. Finding a way to underscore your message with a story, either personal or analogous, will ultimately help you to better capture your audience’s imagination. 6. The 4 C’s Of Telling A Good Story Causality – a logical sequence of events that the audience feels compelled to follow Conflict – the obstacles that pop up between the protagonist and his goals Complications – the challenges that arise just when the path to success looks clear Character – an interesting person with a skill set uniquely tailored to the situation Working all four C’s into your sales messaging will make your case more clear, concise, and compelling to your prospects. Your “story” will be more vivid in their minds, and what you’ve communicated will be more likely to “stick.” What’s The Point? The principles above will coincide with two things, how humans learn, and how they make buying decisions. If you’re ever unsure ow your message is landing, remember; you can always ask! Aside from the obvious result of making a sale, or convincing the prospect to take a specific action, see if you can get them to repeat the main idea of your presentation back to you. If they can, then you know you’ve done your job as a communicator. For more, stay tuned to our blog as we will continue to break down the lessons from The Ultimate Sales Messaging System in future installments. If you want the whole thing, and you just gotta have it now, please check out our online webinar. The Ultimate Sales Messaging System was created by Brian Williams, of Perspectivity Intl. Perspectivity is a “sales growth agency,” established in 2012, and is the product of more than 20 years of experience with global tech giants. ...

Perfecting Your Sales Message: Understanding the Basic Principles of Adult Learning

It’s tricky. How do you make your sales message stick? Why would people believe your pitch? After all, you’re just trying to sell them something, right? Let’s be honest. It’s easy for people to hesitate, doubt you, and go somewhere else. I call this the cycle of stagnation, and the best way to stop any cycle is to simply get off the merry-go-round. It’s time for something new. Instead of trying to get potential clients to understand you and your business, what if we first tried to understand them? With a basic understanding of neuroscience, you can adapt your sales message. Just like a recipe, different formulas yield different results. Science has shown that the recipe for success lies in understanding how people think and process information through the principles of adult learning. The Principles Of Adult Learning Breaking Them Down So what are the basic principles of learning for adults? The five principles are relevance and experience, self-direction, action, practice, and sensory inclusion. 1. Relevance and Experience The content of your message must be meaningful and relevant to your audience’s lives and their businesses. They need to know you understand their struggles and business pain points. This creates a positive emotional connection between you and your audience as they sense your understanding and compassion. It’s also important to remember that adults draw upon their past experiences to aid in the learning process. As such, it’s imperative to frame your message in a language and context that’s familiar to your audience. 2. Self-Direction Adults are autonomous and self-directing since they mostly live under a large degree of self-governance. In turn, adults have a greater response to learning tactics that employ self-directed methods. Ralph Brockett’s and Roger Hiemstra’s Self-Direction in Adult Learning summarizes it best: “…self-direction in learning refers to two distinct but related dimensions. The first of these dimensions is a process in which a learner assumes primary responsibility for planning, implementing, and evaluating the learning process. An education agent or resource often plays a facilitating role in this process. This is the notion of self-directed learning as it has generally been used and identified in professional literature. The second dimension, which we refer to as learner self-direction, centers on a learner’s desire or preference for assuming responsibility for learning.” 3. Action Adults learn by doing and through direct experience. To reach your audience, you must include active and practical participation that offers implementable techniques. 4. Practice Practicing skills in a controlled environment allows for self-efficacy in new tasks. The more one can practice new skills, the more transformational the learning process will be. 5. Sensory Inclusive Ensure that you have appropriately proportioned delivery techniques that meet the needs of audio, visual, reading/writing, kinaesthetic, dependent, and independent learning styles. The Problem If you don’t use the Adult Learning Principles in the design of your sales message or presentation, you may fail to engage the mind of your audience and not make an emotional connection; consequently, you will lose the attention of your audience. The largest problem with the majority of sales messages is that the audience is most often overlooked. It’s almost as if they are an afterthought. Typically, presenters may share everything they know about a product or service but fail miserably when it comes to intentionally addressing the issues or objectives of the audience. The Solution Commit to designing and delivering messaging that follows the adult learning principles. Everyone focuses on the presentation, but the main goal is communication. Stop presenting and begin effectively communicating your ideas to your audience. Why It Works Over the past few decades neuroscience has reached new levels of understanding about the brain and how humans best process information. And while you may think that sharing an abundance of facts will appropriately inform the audience, it is actually the antithesis. Unknowingly, you’re overwhelming them with too much information. Our short-term memories are designed to handle about seven small chunks of information at a time before getting overwhelmed – that’s why most phone numbers are only seven digits long. Simply put, our brains don’t like working too hard to remember large amounts of information all at once, so it’s very important that you understand how to use adult learning principles when designing your sales messages and presentations. These principles will allow you to successfully design messaging that appeals to the human brain and how it processes information. The Cone of Learning Edgar Dale’s Cone of Learning illustrates the importance of incorporating the learning styles into your sales message. Dale’s cone shows the different styles of learning and how much our brains tend to remember with each method. As you can see, the human brain prefers certain methods of learning to others. While you may spend most of your time lecturing, that is considered passive engagement and it is where the human brain processes the least amount of information. Instead, for maximum impact, you should try to spend most of your time engaging all of the senses and employ active learning in your audience. Abandon and Adapt: Putting it all together It’s time we abandon our old methods and adapt a new type of messaging designed to take advantage of the brain’s peak processing power. By creating sales messages and presentations that allow your audience to be active participants (rather than just reading or listening passively), you will be amazed at how often they believe, buy, and bite. So reel ‘em in. And make the catch. ...

Getting Customers To “Believe, Buy, Bite”

“Believe, Buy, Bite.” This mode of thinking has long been a guiding principle for Perspectivity’s efforts to improve the sales and sales messaging of clients. These three B’s are stops along the journey we want all of our prospects to take. We want to craft a credible and believable message that builds rapport with our prospects. We want prospects to buy—obviously—but the process does not end with merely getting them through the sales funnel. Instead of simply enjoying our products and the way we do business, we want them to “take a big bite,” to go forth, and help us to land future prospects via infectious word of mouth. This may sound daunting, but when you look at each step, one by one, it’s pretty straightforward. You must be intensely focused on capturing the attention and understanding of your audience if you want to gain more sales opportunities. That’s the idea, in a nutshell. This is a line from The Ultimate Sales Messaging System, and continues to be a foundational part of how Perspectivity does business. Think of “Believe, Buy, Bite” as a tool to help you accomplish this. Believe means cutting out all the bluster that comes with a lot of sales messaging. Remember, clear, concise, and compelling. Make the audience believe in you and your product’s ability to solve their specific problems. This is where you build trust and rapport with your customer. This requires you to design and deliver your message with a high degree of thoughtfulness and customization. However you like to approach prospects, be it presentations, meetings, etc., tailor your message to the specific people you are talking to on that day. We do not believe in the concept of “one size fits all.” Listen to and understand your individual prospects, and show that you are invested in making them more money and helping solve their problems. Buy comes after you have earned their belief and trust. Making a clear, concise, and compelling case for the prospect will allow them to make an informed purchasing decision. Creating a confident buying environment for the prospect enhances your chance of making the sale. Without that, a prospect will never get any closer to becoming a customer. Bite happens after you’ve made the sale, and only if you’ve taken care to craft the right sales message. When you’ve truly honed your message down to its most effective version, your words will impact your customers to a great enough extent that they will start doing your job for you, helping to bring new customers to you. When this advocacy stage occurs, it means your message has “stuck.” “Bite” is another name for “stickiness.” Like Malcolm Gladwell wrote in his book, The Tipping Point, stickiness is one of the key factors that allow ideas, phenomena, and even brands to take hold and become a trend, a hit, or even an epidemic. When your messaging sticks, customers can’t help but perpetuate it. When you pair that level of messaging with a great product, your customers will swear by it in front of their friends. There it is. Believe, Buy, Bite. As with all of the advice you’ll get from Perspectivity, this approach to making your customer the focal point of your communications is as much about the prospect as it is the seller. Don’t forget the prospect’s point of view when crafting your sales message. Remember, confused prospects rarely buy. Do you have a success story about how you managed to get your customers to “Bite?” Perspectivity would love to hear it! ...

Perspectivity To Appear In Success Magazine

DALLAS—Perspectivity International, along with co-founder Brian Williams, is the subject of a “micro-feature” spread scheduled for the October 2017 issue of Success magazine. “We are in the behavioral change business, because training simply does not work,” said Williams, of his unique sales vantage. “If I can change your perspective, I can change your behavior. If I can change your behavior, I can dramatically change your results.” Perspectivity is a Dallas, Texas-based consultancy and sales growth agency that specializes in enhancing company sales messaging. The company is a product of Williams’ 20-plus years of technical marketing experience with tech companies in Silicon Valley. Perspectivity continues to assist tech companies, as well as those in other industries, in refining their sales message with an approach rooted in both the art and science of selling. Perspectivity has recently begun the process of partnering with other agencies to offer a full-service approach that combines sales and marketing. The company currently offers its expertise in sales messaging, sales presentations, online marketing, websites, and social media. “We believe if people learn to be effective communicators, they can be an influential force in both their professional and personal lives,” Williams believes, regarding the process he aims to familiarize his clients with. “We begin with the audience in mind and we end with the audience in mind, as they are typically the most neglected person in the room.” In addition to the October edition of Success, Brian will make an appearance as a breakout speaker at Hubspot’s Inbound 2017 event, which runs from Sept. 25-28 in Boston, Mass. Williams’ Inbound presentation is titled, “Sales Conversations: Marketing ain’t nothing if you can’t sell sh*t.” Success, also Dallas-based, is a business magazine with both a print and digital edition. The magazine regularly publishes profiles and feature stories about personal development, well-being, and a variety of business topics. It prides itself on guiding its readership by means of motivation, inspiration, and training. The long-running publication has been a bastion of positive thinking, life skills, and discipline since 1897. From the company description on its website (www.success.com/about): “…People need to continually keep up with expanding knowledge and perpetually develop new skills to stay relevant and sustain their lifestyles. In every issue of SUCCESS magazine we will strive to bring you the thought leaders and success experts, both past and present, and reveal their key ideas and strategies to help you excel in every area of your personal and professional life. You also will be provided a unique window into the lives, practices and philosophies of today’s greatest achievers—top CEOs, revolutionary entrepreneurs and other extraordinary leaders.” The October issue is expected to be available in early September of this year. ...

Brian Williams To Speak At Hubspot’s Inbound 2017 (Get Your Discounted Admission Here!)

FUEL THE MOVEMENT – #Inbound17 Come hear Brian speak at Hubspot’s Inbound 2017 in Boston, Massachusetts. Inbound 2017 is Monday-Thursday, September 25-28 at the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center. Brian is a seasoned speaker and sales consultant who presents a unique and effective perspective on refining your sales messaging. Brian’s firm, Perspectivity International, has worked with clients such as AT&T, Cisco, and the NFL. Brian approaches the tried and true subject of communications with a fresh and inventive perspective. Just when you thought you have the skill set down, Brian surprises you with his unique approach that will take you beyond connecting with your audience to increased productivity, greater business impact, and stronger relationships. Cindy H., Head of Talent Development Cisco, San Jose, CA BRIAN’S SESSION AT INBOUND 2017 Brian’s session at Inbound 2017 is found in the Inbound Sales Track on Wednesday, September 27th from 3:30 PM – 4:15 PM. His topic this year is: Sales Conversations: Marketing ain’t nothing if you can’t sell sh*t.   ...

It’s All In Perspective

DALLAS, TEXAS—Perspectivity International has named Abilene, Texas-based Jemully Media as the latest of its preferred marketing partners, adding the fast-rising digital marketing agency to its family of content marketing and social media experts who will serve selected companies within Perspectivity International’s clientele. “This connection makes sense in so many says,” said Perspectivity founder Brian Williams, who, with co-founder Tasha Williams, screened a range of agencies to find a company that could mesh best with his own firm and help take Perspectivity’s unique approach to new heights. “We’re already collaborating to implement strategic initiatives that are going to take our clients further than we’ve ever been able to take them before,” Williams said. “The Jemully team includes social media marketing specialists, web developers, people with many years’ experience in inbound marketing, and especially a strong team of writers. Their content marketing staff is top notch. They’ve been in business for about as long as we have—that is, about 6 years—and like us they’ve been successful and have built a nice portfolio of clients. We’re excited to involve Jemully Media in projects involving some of our clients and get the benefit of Jemully’s creativity, energy, and digital marketing flair.” Kit Mullins, founder and team leader at Jemully Media, said that her firm is equally excited to be working with Perspectivity International, and to be extending services to new and interesting clients. “We are doing work for Perspectivity itself—such as website work and social media messaging—and beyond that, we are doing work for clients of Perspectivity,” Mullins said. “They’ve kept us extremely busy in the scant weeks we’ve been associated with them. We like where we see this relationship going—there is a synergy here that is good for Jemully, and we think it is good for Perspectivity and Perspectivity’s clients, too. Overall, it’s a great fit.” A recent article by Gateway News Source described this partnering of agencies as indicative of a trend that is gaining traction in the marketing world. Gateway’s coverage included this observation: “Whether it’s called ‘agency partnering,’ ‘inter-agency collaboration,’ or ‘horizontality,’ the trend of two or more agencies teaming up to serve one client (or even multiple clients) is a phenomenon that continues to gain traction in marketing’s fast-changing landscape.” Gateway News also remarked on the relative strengths of each of the organizations: “Perspectivity International has a strong emphasis on sales messaging. That is their stock-in-trade. Jemully Media, though they are somewhat more of a traditional digital agency, in that they handle a large amount of website development and social media management for their clientele, have a pronounced emphasis on content marketing. As the leaders at each of the respective businesses have indicated, Perspectivity would prefer to keep its emphasis on sales messaging and involve Jemully for content marketing, website, and social media work, and Jemully is pleased to lend its own expertise to Perspectivity clients and leave the sales messaging and branding to Perspectivity, at least where Perspectivity’s clients are involved.” In other business developments, Perspectivity founder Brian Williams has been named as one of the speakers at Hubspot’s “Inbound 2017” event in Boston, a Sept. 25-28 occasion that annually attracts some 20,000 attendees and that organizers say will serve “marketing and sales professionals from almost every industry imaginable and from all corners of the globe.” Inbound’s stated purpose is to “celebrate the human, helpful side of business” and to “provide the inspiration, education, and connections needed to grow [any] business.” Williams will speak in one of the breakout sessions. The featured speakers will include former first lady Michelle Obama, as well as some of the top names in online marketing. (For information on that event and Williams’ part in it, visit this page.) ...

6 Signs Your Sales Message Needs An Overhaul (Infographic)

CEB‘s global research of over 4 million business professionals found that only 17% scored high enough to qualify for insight selling. Feel like you might not fall into that 17% when trying to make a sale? Companies increase sales by building an effective sales message. So how do you know if your sales messaging needs improvement? Here are 6 surefire signs that your sales messages is in desperate needs of an overhaul. How many of these describe you or your company? The Sales Plateau: If your sales have been average for an extended period of time, it might be time to analyze your sales message. After all, the goal of any business is to have a constant increase across the board. As such, a sales plateau should be seen as just as much of a threat as a sales decline. However, to increase profitability, you have to increase sales probability. What’s directly tied to your sales probability? Your sales message. So here’s your sign: if sales have remained stagnant, it’s time to fine tune your sales message. The Face-to-Face Fail: There are many ways to make a sale, but face-to-face is one of the most important. If you’re struggling to close the deal when face-to-face with prospects, your sales message is likely the culprit. The Bored Audience: There is no clearer indication that your messaging needs some serious saving than a bored audience. If you can’t engage your audience, you can’t make a sale; plain and simple. The Failed Attempts: Have you tried training sessions in the past that haven’t generated sales or influenced action? Try changing your perspective. Look to a new sales message, not to more training. The Head Scratcher: Does your sales pitch leave your audience confused? A confused lead will never turn into a solid sale. No one is going to buy into something that they don’t understand. The Sloppy Sell: Selling is a language of its own, and unfortunately, it’s one many aren’t fluent in. If you communicate poorly when making a pitch, it’s time to overhaul. Did any of these signs hit close to home? That’s where we come in. We’re here to help increase your emotional intelligence by learning to effectively communicate, and when it comes to making a sale, the basis of that communication comes down to your message. The keys to success? Reframe your perspective. Reform your communication. See rising results. ...

The Art And Science Of Selling (Part 1)

Welcome to the first part of our series, breaking down a few of the lessons from The Ultimate Sales Messaging System. This system is designed to teach exceptional communication skills to improve selling technique. It encompasses both the art and science behind crafting the perfect sales pitch. Enjoy! We are all in sales. Another way of putting it is that we all have goals we want to accomplish. For so many, communication skills can be a roadblock, when they really should be the thing that helps us clinch the deal. Developing exceptional communication skills takes practice, a deep understanding of your audience, and a commitment to using the latest scientific and artistic principles to deliver the message. Read on to find out how. Clear, concise, and compelling. We are going to use this phrase a lot. Stop confusing your prospects, because confused prospects rarely buy. When we can know our audience intimately, have a basic understanding of the adult learning process, and design our message and delivery to create a confident purchasing environment, we can remove the potential barrier of a confused prospect. When communicating the details and capabilities of your products to your customers, you must be able to answer when the prospect asks: “How can this product help me make more money or get rid of my problem?” Clearly, it helps when we can offer a solution our customers can believe in framed within the concept of Return on Investment (ROI). The Difficulty Of The Problem Many people who struggle with their messaging get stuck on faulty cliches, like a mystical “it factor” that good presenters have, a persistent fear of failure, and the double-edged sword of perfectionism. In my experience, these and others concerns are all myths, and none are sufficient to prevent someone from becoming an exceptional communicator. It’s about more than enunciation and eye contact; we need to be the architects of our sales messages. The same way an architect needs his preliminary plans, site inspections, and blueprints before construction can commence, a salesman needs audience profiles, a communication design plan, and content storyboards before he can begin writing and editing his pitch. Many difficulties can crop up in this stage. Fortunately, most design difficulties can be overcome by: Approaching each new prospect with a clean slate and being ready to customize what you do for each individual. Listening attentively to your prospects and figuring out the simplest way to address their specific concerns and help them make more money. Don’t overload customers by telling them everything you know all at once. Again, think about how you can clearly, concisely, and compellingly tell them only the details that pertain directly to them. This is as much about what you leave out as what you put in. Channel your many sources of collaboration and input into one focused message stream. Strip away the extra stuff that does not direct your prospect toward a buying decision. Remember, clear, concise, and compelling. Following the four steps above when designing your messaging helps you avoid overwhelming your customer. An overwhelmed customer is a confused customer–and confused customers rarely buy. Ironically, the customer is the most frequently overlooked person in sales messaging. Don’t let your customer be an afterthought. Craft all communications with them in mind. The Adult Learning Process We can’t all be scientists, but we can keep up with what the field of neuroscience has revealed about the human learning process. For example, people tend to be able to remember about seven chunks of information at a time–which is why phone numbers tend to have 7 digits, excluding the area code. Also, keep in mind that people tend to remember far more information from presentations they are actively engaged with than they do from purely lecture-style presentations. Knowing these and other basic principles will help us, as communicators, to not overwhelm our audience. For now, we’ll leave off with the “Believe, Buy, Bite” system. Believe means cutting out all the bluster that comes with a lot of sales messaging. Remember, clear, concise, and compelling. Make the audience believe in you and your product’s ability to solve their specific problems. This is where you build trust and rapport with your customer. Buy means putting extra emphasis on making your message compelling. With this, you have a good chance at making the sale. Without it, a prospect will never get any closer to becoming a customer. Bite comes after you’ve made the sale. When you’ve truly honed your message down to its most effective version, your customers are going to believe in you and your product to a great enough extent that they will start doing your job for you, helping to bring new customers to you. It means your message has “stuck.” For more, stay tuned to our blog as we will continue to break down the lessons from The Ultimate Sales Messaging System. If you want the whole thing, and you just gotta have it now, please check out our online webinar. The Ultimate Sales Messaging System was created by Brian Williams, of Perspectivity Intl. Perspectivity is a “sales growth agency,” established in 2012, and is the product of more than 20 years of experience with global tech giants. ...

The 7 M’s: Marrying Your Wedding Vows And Your Sales Pitch (Infographic)

In one way or another, we are all in sales. Crafting a sales message, when done right, can resemble a great marriage. The parallels run deep. For those of us who are married, remember, your foremost customer in life is your very own spouse. Make him or her happy each and every day by delivering the goods you promised in your vows (a sales pitch by another name, if you think about it). In marriage, just as in sales, we benefit from a daily re-commitment to our values. Marriage involves two becoming one. A salesman’s relationship with his customer, at its best, will be very similar. As salespeople, we must listen to our customers, build trust by focusing on what they need to be successful, and aiding in the decision process that should improve the financial standing of everybody involved (not just ourselves). All of these sales elements (and more) are equally important in maintaining a successful, glowing marriage. This infographic is a quick rundown of the seven biggest lessons I’ve learned from my marriage that I have also applied to my business. They all revolve around the idea that we want must build our relationships to last, both in our personal and professional lives. Click here for my original post on the subject: 7 Reasons Why My Horrible Marriage Led To A Great Business! ...

Is Your Company Self-Sabotaging Your Sales?

A recent study, by marketing research firm CSO Insights, revealed, “The top challenge in sales organizations today is that 90% of sales leaders believe that representatives have missed opportunities because of information overload.” The study shows that salespeople are missing opportunities to close sales because they are overloaded with information from their own companies. Unfortunately, information overload is a problem of epidemic proportion. Why? The Challenge For Sales Organizations In this information age we have instant and constant access to information. It is extremely easy to create (email, PDFs, newsletters) and disseminate (email, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube) information, which produces information overload. Too much information always leads to confused prospects, and confused prospects rarely buy. The original challenge for sales organizations was to quickly and easily create and disseminate information to market to the masses. Not only has this been accomplished, but it has also been grossly overdone. Now the challenge for sales organizations has become to refine that information and only share what is specifically relevant to a prospect’s problem. Unsurprisingly, this is VERY difficult to do because we all have a passionate love affair with our own products and services. Two Fundamental Problems From Information Overload Here are two fundamental problems created from when people have too much information: The sales person is often confused because he/she has access to too much information and attempts to communicate most of it to the prospect. As a result, the communication usually lacks structure, brevity, and clarity…all critical components of effective communication. The prospect is confused because scientific research proves that humans simply cannot process excess information, especially if it is not logically structured, takes too long, or is unclear. 2 Questions To Ask About Your Salesperson If your salesperson is overloaded with information, do they have the necessary skills to both refine and communicate information to prospects with clarity and brevity? Are they able to identify what is most important to the prospect and present a strong, unique solution that will meet their greatest need? It takes tremendous skill to communicate with clarity and brevity since these are skills that are taught, not caught. Therefore, a salesperson must not only know their product or service inside and out, but they must also know how to make a prospect understand how their product or service will solve a real problem, using the LEAST amount of information possible. A savvy salesperson will know how to help a customer buy, by only sharing information that is relevant to that conversation. Prospects no longer want to be told how great a product is, they want to know that their greatest need is understood, and a viable solution exists to resolve it. The 4 C’s of Excellent Communicators If you believe, like 90% of sales leaders, that your salespeople may have missed opportunities because of information overload, provide an opportunity for them to learn to become excellent communicators. Forbes Magazine says, “Communication skills are what get you promoted,” and after my 20 years of global experience, I would add that they also impact a company’s overall sales. ...