Don’t Waterboard Your Audience

Have you been here? About one third of the way through your pitch, you look around the room and your audience is drowning in the flood of your words. You can tell you’ve lost them long before you’ve even gotten to the point. They are doodling, looking out the window, or flipping through the pages of your handouts. They are not listening to you and your message is dead on arrival. It could be that you are saying too much. Your audience cannot keep up. There is a downpour of information, and they don’t see how the pieces fit together. Take a Test – If you have experienced this dead-eyed audience, or even suspect it, I have an exercise you can try.  Get together with an acquaintance who doesn’t know too much about your business. Ask if he will help you out by listening to your pitch and answering the following questions. Then, tell him your elevator pitch. Keep it to about one minute. Then ask him these 3 questions: What does your company do? How can your company make life better for its clients? How would a potential client take the next step to purchase? Your Test Results – If your acquaintance cannot answer those three questions clearly and precisely, it could be that you have not honed your sales message down to exactly what you do, your benefits, and how to “place an order.” You may be communicating too much ancillary information at the expense of the vital stuff. This lack of targeted focus on your part is probably the culprit that is losing your audience to daydreams and doodles during presentations. Prepping to Retake the Test – Let me show you how you can change your audience’s perspective by employing a tool called a storyboard. The storyboard is a process that will help you organize the points of your sales message, allowing you to intensely focus your points so you don’t drown them in too much information. A clear, concise message will compel your audience to conform to your expectations because they will see that you understand their needs and can deliver a solution that solves a problem for them and ultimately makes a positive impact on their revenue. The Formula – A good storyboard is made of of three main points. It begins with an introduction that tells your audience where you are going. It smoothly transitions from point to point, always reminding the audience where you are ultimately going. And where are you going? You are going to demonstrate how you can solve a problem for them. And, in conclusion, you will wrap up the points with a clear call to action that helps the audience fully understand the next step to take to buy your product or service. See the infographic below to help you visualize the storyboard process.  Pass the Test with Higher Results – As you prepare for your next big sales presentation, take the time to test your elevator pitch with an acquaintance (or several). Get their feedback to ensure you know your messaging is refined enough that it can be reduced, and repeated by others who have only heard it once. If you don’t pass the elevator pitch test with a score of 100%, follow the storyboard formula so you can ace the next presentation. ...

What Do Warren Buffett, Aluminum, Bottled Water, and Ernest Hemingway Have In Common?

What do Warren Buffet, aluminum, bottled water and Ernest Hemingway have in common? All 4 can teach us a powerful lesson in how to sharpen our communication skills. Lesson 1: Warren Buffett Prioritize Your Communication Skills   Warren Buffet said that the number one skill that any of us can have is effective communication skills. Why would he pick communication out of all the other skills? I ask you the exact same thing. As it relates to your plans and goals, where do effective communication skills rank on the scale of your priorities in your business? Think about your business presentations. Are you still opening your presentations by telling people what your company is and how great your products and services are? Are you still using Power Point? If so it might be time to take a look at your communication skills and the tools you use to communicate. ...

Crafting Audience Profiles For Your Sales Pitches

You’ve probably heard of “consumer profiles,” and while those can be incredibly helpful as well, the article and infographic below are about “audience profiles” When we make a presentation or sales pitch, we are conversing with an audience. What does this audience look like? That’s what we’re talking about here. Enjoy! There are few things more important to the sales messaging process than the creation of an audience profile. Though this is just one piece of the 6 step system, it is foundational to the overall message you’re crafting. You have to be clear who you’re speaking to in order to achieve your intended goals. Once created, it should be continuously updated to reflect the dynamics of the audience you will present to. I’ve identified 10 elements that should be considered in order to create each audience profile. To help you get started, check out our graphic below for 5 questions that will help you formulate 5 of the 10 key elements. How To Craft Audience Profiles   1. Define the Meeting Purpose Before conducting a meeting, it’s imperative to ask yourself why the meeting is being held. This will give you a clear understanding of your goals and purpose, thus making it easier for you to create a sales message that is hyper focused on the issues at hand. 2. Define Your Target Audience Who exactly would you like to attend this particular meeting? This is your target audience. Write down their names and send them an invitation with adequate time to commit. 3. Set the Date, Time and Location Though this step seems like a given, the thought that goes behind it is often overlooked. After defining your target audience, decide the best place to meet that will assist you in achieving your desired outcome. Your office may not always be the best place, so consider other possibilities. Do so by carefully considering the attendees and decide the most strategic place of operation. When choosing your venue, take the time to also decide a date and time that makes it easiest for them to attend. 4. Envision the Outcome It’s crucial to define your desired outcome long before the meeting or presentation takes place. Do you want those in attendance to schedule a follow up meeting? Agree to hire you? Decide to sign a contract? No matter what the end goal, consider in advance what you can do to specifically tailor your messaging around your desired result. Remember! Success is never accidental. 5. List Your Allies Think of those who will be in attendance and make a mental or physical list of who will most likely agree with the solution or ideas you will present. These are your allies. Make a point to speak with them before the meeting to ensure their buy-in. And while you present, make eye contact with them often. Positive feedback and support from your allies can be your best marketing campaign. Enjoy Success! The audience profile is an important tool to help clearly identify the prospect, their critical issues and concerns and who the decision makers are. Don’t forget! The decision makers need to be in the room. And remember, this is only the first step in designing an effective sales message. Using an audience profile, though, will keep you focused, prepared and ultimately, facilitate your success. By building profiles, your focus remains on the most important people in the room: your audience.   ...

The Art And Science Of Selling (Part 4)

When we are designing and honing our sales presentations, it’s easy to wind up with way more information than necessary. For the audience’s sake, we need to whittle away that which isn’t vital to the communication process, and then organize the stuff we decide to keep in a way that will hold the audience’s attention. Without further ado, here are a few “cinematic” tips for organizing a sales presentation. Organizing The “Scenes” Of Your Messaging Just like a good movie, a good presentation should have logical continuity. You can achieve this in your presentation by thinking of the components as “scenes,” and making sure your scenes flow logically (again… like in a movie). There should be a proper order that makes the most sense, so make sure you find it! Here are a few common examples of continuity that might provide the right structure for your presentation: Chronological Order – A timeline, essentially. First things first, last things last, etc. Climactic Order – Start with the smaller, less important details and save the most dramatic and important event for last. Problem/Solution Order – Build a case by giving a problem, then giving the solution. Rinse and repeat. Topical Order – Break your main topic down into smaller subtopics, tying each subtopic back to the main one. Logical Order – End each of your points with a transition that directly sets up the next one. Storyboarding & Transitions (also known as “Brain Candy”) Storyboarding Storyboarding was a tactic employed by Walt Disney Studios in the 30’s that remains in use today. It is a way to “preview” what the final product will look like before actually producing it. For a complex presentation, one with many points or topics that require structure and transitions, the clarity provided by a good storyboarding session will be well worth the time investment. Transitions Transitions are the glue that hold the “scenes” together. To neglect your transitions is to risk losing your audience to confusion or boredom. When designing transitions, think, “how can I connect Point A with Point B?” Here’s the basic structure for connecting your points with a transition: Point A: We have more than 3 critical bugs. Transition: For example… Point B: Voicemail only records for 12 seconds instead of 24. The transition (“For example…”) indicates to your audience that Point B is actually one of the bugs hinted at by Point A. It’s a subtle touch, but makes a huge difference to your audience if you are dropping a lot of information on them. Ask For Feedback Feedback is vitally important to fine-tuning your message over time. After a presentation, always ask your audience to tell you what they thought of it. If they were bored and started playing with their phone or tuned you out because certain points didn’t connect well, then you know your transitions could use some work. Sometimes the truth hurts, but it can also be a specific and powerful motivator for improving our sales messaging. Remember, confused prospects rarely buy. In these past four parts, we have been exploring the concepts that our six-step system has been built upon. In the next part of our series, we will dive right into the actual steps of The Ultimate Sales Messaging System. The six steps are divided into two overarching categories: Design and Delivery. Over the next several installments in this series, we’ll be breaking down the ABC’s and XYZ’s that will be instrumental in improving your sales messaging. Design Step 1: The Audience Profile Step 2: The Basic Building Block Step 3: The Content Storyboard Delivery Step 4: eXamine Your Content Step 5: Your Preparation Step 6: Zero In On Your Audience That is what’s to come in our series. We’re glad to be with you on your journey to mastering sales and becoming an excellent communicator. To review the first three parts of the series, click below: Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 ...

A New Perspective On Sales Messaging [Infographic]

You may not know this about me, but I have a love of public speaking. While many people shy away from getting in front of a crowd and delivering a message, others are downright afraid of it. Not me. I enjoy speaking so much that I have done it competitively through Toastmasters. My guess is that if you are in sales you at least share my interest in communicating, even if you have not done it competitively. I Like IT. Beyond my interest in public speaking, I have another interest. I enjoy technology. In fact, I was an engineer in corporate America for two decades. While in that role, I made an observation about sales presentations. Some were successful and some failed. I wondered why. Failures sparked questions. I began looking critically at our sales presentations to learn what made them different. Why did some efforts as sales communications fall short? In addition to my critical analysis, I started asking for customer feedback when we failed to close a deal. The results from my analysis combined with their feedback was informative. No, it was astounding! Analysis brought answers. I concluded the presentations used by the sales team failed because they did not effectively address the customers’ questions of how our product would make them more money or how our product would help eliminate their biggest problem. I also observed that our presentations were not clear. They were not concise. They were not engaging nor were they interactive. In fact, the traditional slide deck presentations were overwhelming our customers with too much information. Too many details and too much data about the technology was presented while not giving them the real information they were longing to hear. We changed our perspective. So I developed a system to help communicate the sales message in a way that would connect with the customers’ needs, and give the customers an opportunity to be involved in learning how our product would help them increase revenue and/or eliminate their biggest problem. The following infographic highlights some of the ways a traditional presentation, like the ones our team used, can fail, and how a new perspective on sales messaging can help to transform a presentation into an effective tool that brings results. (Click to enlarge the infographic.) Giving customers what they want. The new perspective I gained on how to deliver a successful sales message became abundantly clear. Customers who listened to the presentations did not want many details that would bog them down; they wanted solutions to their problems. They wanted to know how to make more money at the end of the day so their businesses would grow. They wanted sales reps who could make the material simple and easy to understand, and who were equipped with the knowledge to answer their questions. I have seen this system work again and again. Traditional communication methods that rely primarily on overfilled slide decks can cause your listeners’ eyes to glaze and their minds to wander. Those communication styles fall short of telling the audience what they really want to know. Instead, put this new systematic approach into practice. Change your perspective from what you have to tell the customer to what the customer needs to learn. Then, customize the learning to specifically address their issues and objectives. It’s not complicated, and that’s the beauty of it. It’s simplified, interactive, and… it works. ...

Start it Right: How To Build A Sales Presentation

Every sales message has the intent of being successful by driving your audience to action. However, not all sales messages achieve this goal. I have found that in order to be truly exceptional, it is critical that your sales message starts the right way, with the proper cornerstone in place. It’s about knowing how to build a sales presentation. To be exceptional, you must use a well-designed communication principle that builds upon a firm, audience-centric foundation. As an example, let me quote from an article by The Hartford that gives sales guidance to business owners. In the “Business Owner’s Playbook,” The Hartford communicates a familiar message for sales: Identify the problem. Appeal to your audience’s emotions, and get them thinking that they really need to find a solution to this problem. This builds trust, and shows that you “get it.” Present the solution. Introduce and describe your product or service and touch on why it solves the problem. Demonstrate value. Go into more detail on how your product or service solves the problem. Use research results, statistics, awards, testimonials, and specific examples to build your case. State a call to action. The call to action is probably the single most defining feature of direct response marketing. It clearly tells the customer what you expect them to do next. Give them the tools and contact points, such as a phone number, email address, shopping cart link, or website link depending on the action you want them to take. This sales message is good. It is not exceptional. We can identify an opportunity to take a good sales message and transform it into one that is clear, concise, and compelling. The transformation begins at the most basic, foundational level. It begins with laying the appropriate audience-centric cornerstone as mentioned above. This critical piece is missing in The Hartford example. Once in place, the cornerstone will be built provide support for a more cohesive and compelling message that makes a stronger impact on the audience. Understanding the Cornerstone Concept The cornerstone of your sales message must be intensely focused on your audience. It must hone in on his primary goal or objective. Many times, the goal is confused and out of order. Instead of being in-tune with the goal of the audience, the message is more in-tune with the goal of our own company — “to get the audience to buy our product.” That is the wrong order. The most effective sales message keeps the the goal of the audience first and the goal of our own company as a natural second. The goal and objective of your audience is specific to him, and it is almost always ultimately to increase revenue or reduce overhead. Key Point – In crafting the cornerstone of your sales message: Listen carefully to your audience. Learn what he desires. Refer to it often. Once the cornerstone is in place, the building blocks of your sales message will support and remind the audience that you understand his goal, recognize his problem, and have the best solution to reach his goal. The building blocks will look more like this: Cornerstone Goal – State your audience’s objective or desired outcome Pain Points – Acknowledge your understanding of his problem Solution – Demonstrate how and why your company provides the best solution to overcome his problem and achieve his goal (referring back to points one and two) Supporting Arguments – Present data and statistics to underscore the credibility of your company’s solution. Present facts in a simple, visual way that is easy for him to understand. Closing Arguments – Stay focused on the audience’s goal and clearly communicate what you want your audience to do after hearing your message. Resist the temptation to give him more information than he needs to make an informed decision. If you remember that your audience is king, they will respect you for it, and your sales message will be exceptional. Sales Message: Start Right with the Cornerstone ...

The Art And Science Of Selling (Part 3)

Welcome to the third part of our series, breaking down the lessons from The Ultimate Sales Messaging System. This system is designed to teach exceptional communication skills to improve selling technique. It encompasses both the art and science behind crafting the perfect sales pitch. Enjoy! In Part 1, we discussed the basics of effective sales messaging, including focusing on what your audience needs, fixing common communication issues, and understanding the adult learning process. In Part 2, we discussed the idea of filtering out excess information, not oversharing with your audience, and making your message “sticky.” And now, here are four things to keep in mind as you incorporate visual aids into your presentations. Read on, for Part 3 awaits… 1. Common Questions About Using Visuals (Sometimes Referred To As “Slides”) Question: Do I need to use visuals? Answer: It depends on what you’re presenting. Never assume that you must use visuals. They should only be used if they add real value, not decoration. Question: When should I use visuals? Answer: When you can easily replace one hundred words, or excessive facts or data, with an image or graphic, then you should use them. Question: What is the purpose of visuals? Answer: Visuals should reduce complexity, increase understanding, and decrease the audience’s short-term memory workload. If your visuals do that, you should use them. 2. A Few Wise Words “Communication is about getting others to adopt your point of view, to help them understand why you’re excited (or sad, or optimistic, or whatever else you are). If all you want to do is create a file of facts and figures, then cancel the meeting and send in a report!” -Seth Godin “True presentations focus on the presenter and the visionary ideas and concepts they want to communicate. The images (slides) reinforce the content visually rather than create distraction, allowing the audience to comfortably focus on both. It takes an investment of time on the part of the presenter to develop and rehearse this type of content, but the results are worth it.” -Nancy Duarte In summary, presentations should be about conveying the emotion behind an idea that a simple report cannot. It is this deeper connection, beyond mere facts, that makes presentations worth the time to design and deliver. 3. The Four Principles Of Visual Communication 1. Simplicity Your visuals should simplify what was formerly complex. If the visual itself needs explaining to be understood, then it does not have simplicity. 2. Elegance Effective visuals should be appealing to the eye, with color, contrast, and spatial balance. Remember, when you have too much going on in a visual, you can confuse the viewer. 3. Focus The purpose of the visual should be clear. Keep this in mind, and don’t forget about techniques such as highlighting the most important part or blurring out the less important parts. 4. Clarity The visual should be easy to comprehend in 5 seconds or less. Otherwise, it’s too complex. 4. Drop The Crutch! This is what visuals SHOULD NOT be: 1. A Guide. You should be the one to confidently guide your audience through your presentation; you are the expert, after all. Depending on a slideshow can bore an audience. Don’t undermine your message! 2. A Substitute For Good Content. Rich content should be your driving force. Visuals can be a supplement, but they do not replace the meat and potatoes that actually speak to the concerns and issues of your audience. 3. Loaded With Text. Keep it clear, concise, and compelling. Allow them to listen rather than forcing them to read. 4. Complex. Don’t distract or confuse your audience by over-communicating. Find the approach that simply cuts straight to the core of your message to make it as simple as possible for the audience to understand. Remember, confused prospects rarely buy.   Stay tuned to our blog, as we will continue to break down the lessons from The Ultimate Sales Messaging System in future installments. If you want the whole thing, and you just gotta have it now, please check out our online webinar. The Ultimate Sales Messaging System was created by Brian Williams, of Perspectivity Intl. Perspectivity is a sales growth agency, established in 2012, and is the product of more than 20 years of experience with global tech giants. ...

The Art And Science Of Selling (Part 2)

Welcome to the second part of our series, breaking down the lessons from The Ultimate Sales Messaging System business eBook. This system is designed to teach exceptional communication skills to improve selling technique. It encompasses both the art and science behind crafting the perfect sales pitch. Enjoy! For so many, communication skills can be a roadblock, when they really should be the thing that helps us clinch the deal. Developing exceptional communication skills takes practice, a deep understanding of your audience, and a commitment to using the latest scientific and artistic principles to deliver the message. Read on to find out how. Be clear, concise, and compelling. Stop confusing your prospects, because confused prospects rarely buy. When we can know our audience intimately, have a basic understanding of the adult learning process, and design our message and delivery to create a confident purchasing environment, we can remove the potential barrier of a confused prospect. When communicating the details and capabilities of your products to your customers, you must be able to answer when the prospect asks: “How can this product help me make more money or get rid of my problem?” Clearly, it helps when we can offer a solution our customers can believe in framed within the concept of Return on Investment (ROI). Now, on to Part 2. Follow these 6 Principles so your prospects can do two things… Believe and Buy. 1. The Process Of Filtration The less you talk, the more you’re listened to. -Abigail Van Buren We live in an age of media overload and “too much information” (TMI). As both consumers and presenters, we must learn to filter out excess information and focus on what’s really important. Excess quantity of information negatively impacts the quality of learning. In this case, less truly is more. We call it “filter failure” when we allow our message to be diluted by information that does not build directly upon our main idea. Don’t be guilty of aggravated assault with a wordy weapon! 2. A Little Self-Control Filter failure comes in many forms. Here are some of the most common ways that we allow our words to overwhelm our audience: Add-Ons (adding extra facts just because you want to) Stories (KISS – Keep It Short, Speaker!) Long Introductions (remember the value of a minute) Lack Of Preparation (flow-killers like run-ons, fill-ins, start-overs) Loving Your Own Information (help your audience, don’t be precious) We must get these common problems under control. Our access to technology makes it easy to create and disseminate information, which leads to information overload. It’s so easy to throw a ton of info into a Power Point that it actually tends to do both the speaker and audience a disservice. We need to be better than the technology, and not use it as a crutch. Technology is so much fun, but we can drown in our technology. The fog of information can drown out knowledge.” -Daniel J. Boorstin Don’t drown out information. If you know how to avoid that, you will build trust with your audience, who will then appreciate that you know how to speak their language and solve their problems without overwhelming them. 3. The Power of Clarity Simplicity leads to CLARITY and clarity unleashes the true POWER of effective communication.” It isn’t always easy to employ both clarity and simplicity, which means it’s all the more vital to make the effort. For starters, try to avoid these typical traps: Cultural Cliches (avoid catchphrases that people from other backgrounds might not understand) Meandering Message (ensure a logical flow of ideas in your messaging) Aggravating Acronyms (never use an acronym without defining it, even common ones like “AKA”) Cute Or Crazy (avoid undermining your own credibility; something you might think is cute may look crazy to your audience) 4. The Curse Of Knowledge The curse of knowledge is a problem that leads to “mutual mystification,” a force that derails sales conversations on a daily basis. The “curse” is that, when we know something, we often feel compelled to explain or share it with others in a way that they are not prepared for. This leads to confusion, and confused customers rarely buy. These two solutions can help to alleviate the burden of knowledge: Use quotes and imagery to underscore your point, while giving your audience a chance to digest what you’ve told them so far. Speak their language by using common, everyday examples that can more clearly explain an overly technical idea. Every new idea must build on ideas that the student already knows. -Daniel T. Willingham As tempting as it is to add new information, exceptional communicators who focus on simplicity have the advantage of building rapport with their audience. 5. Stickiness (according to the book, “Made To Stick”) Six key elements of creating a “sticky” message: 1. Simplicity We’ve been over this, but remember; the human brain is wired to retain a certain number of information chunks. This is why phone numbers have 7 digits (excluding the area code). If you are breaking your presentation into chunks, keep this in mind. People are pretty good about remembering 3 or fewer chunks, but when you inch closer to the magical number of 7, or even beyond that (Heaven forbid), you’re really playing with fire and run the risk of overwhelming the audience. 2. Unexpectedness To maintain the interest of your audience without overwhelming them, give your material a degree of mystery or suspense to “keep the butts in the seats.” Be deliberate in how you establish and then build on new ideas. 3. Concreteness Avoid ambiguities and stick to more concrete examples that are easier for everybody to understand. 4. Credibility An obstacle that just comes with the territory is that customers almost always see sales messages as having strings attached. They are right, which is why it is important to cite impartial sources and statistics whenever it makes sense to do so. The message means more when it’s coming from someone who isn’t trying to sell you something. 5. Emotion Make your audience feel something. Emotion will mean different things in different scenarios. Depending on your product or service, crafting a presentation that stokes a sense of compassion, energy, sadness, joy, fear, anger, elation, etc. will help your message to stick. 6. Stories The Harvard Business Review asserts that tossing out the Power Point in favor of a more convincing story is a better way of engaging on a deeper level. People connect better with stories than they do with data in a vacuum. Finding a way to underscore your message with a story, either personal or analogous, will ultimately help you to better capture your audience’s imagination. 6. The 4 C’s Of Telling A Good Story Causality – a logical sequence of events that the audience feels compelled to follow Conflict – the obstacles that pop up between the protagonist and his goals Complications – the challenges that arise just when the path to success looks clear Character – an interesting person with a skill set uniquely tailored to the situation Working all four C’s into your sales messaging will make your case more clear, concise, and compelling to your prospects. Your “story” will be more vivid in their minds, and what you’ve communicated will be more likely to “stick.” What’s The Point? The principles above will coincide with two things, how humans learn, and how they make buying decisions. If you’re ever unsure ow your message is landing, remember; you can always ask! Aside from the obvious result of making a sale, or convincing the prospect to take a specific action, see if you can get them to repeat the main idea of your presentation back to you. If they can, then you know you’ve done your job as a communicator. For more, stay tuned to our blog as we will continue to break down the lessons from The Ultimate Sales Messaging System in future installments. If you want the whole thing, and you just gotta have it now, please check out our online webinar. The Ultimate Sales Messaging System was created by Brian Williams, of Perspectivity Intl. Perspectivity is a “sales growth agency,” established in 2012, and is the product of more than 20 years of experience with global tech giants. ...

Perfecting Your Sales Message: Understanding the Basic Principles of Adult Learning

It’s tricky. How do you make your sales message stick? Why would people believe your pitch? After all, you’re just trying to sell them something, right? Let’s be honest. It’s easy for people to hesitate, doubt you, and go somewhere else. I call this the cycle of stagnation, and the best way to stop any cycle is to simply get off the merry-go-round. It’s time for something new. Instead of trying to get potential clients to understand you and your business, what if we first tried to understand them? With a basic understanding of neuroscience, you can adapt your sales message. Just like a recipe, different formulas yield different results. Science has shown that the recipe for success lies in understanding how people think and process information through the principles of adult learning. The Principles Of Adult Learning Breaking Them Down So what are the basic principles of learning for adults? The five principles are relevance and experience, self-direction, action, practice, and sensory inclusion. 1. Relevance and Experience The content of your message must be meaningful and relevant to your audience’s lives and their businesses. They need to know you understand their struggles and business pain points. This creates a positive emotional connection between you and your audience as they sense your understanding and compassion. It’s also important to remember that adults draw upon their past experiences to aid in the learning process. As such, it’s imperative to frame your message in a language and context that’s familiar to your audience. 2. Self-Direction Adults are autonomous and self-directing since they mostly live under a large degree of self-governance. In turn, adults have a greater response to learning tactics that employ self-directed methods. Ralph Brockett’s and Roger Hiemstra’s Self-Direction in Adult Learning summarizes it best: “…self-direction in learning refers to two distinct but related dimensions. The first of these dimensions is a process in which a learner assumes primary responsibility for planning, implementing, and evaluating the learning process. An education agent or resource often plays a facilitating role in this process. This is the notion of self-directed learning as it has generally been used and identified in professional literature. The second dimension, which we refer to as learner self-direction, centers on a learner’s desire or preference for assuming responsibility for learning.” 3. Action Adults learn by doing and through direct experience. To reach your audience, you must include active and practical participation that offers implementable techniques. 4. Practice Practicing skills in a controlled environment allows for self-efficacy in new tasks. The more one can practice new skills, the more transformational the learning process will be. 5. Sensory Inclusive Ensure that you have appropriately proportioned delivery techniques that meet the needs of audio, visual, reading/writing, kinaesthetic, dependent, and independent learning styles. The Problem If you don’t use the Adult Learning Principles in the design of your sales message or presentation, you may fail to engage the mind of your audience and not make an emotional connection; consequently, you will lose the attention of your audience. The largest problem with the majority of sales messages is that the audience is most often overlooked. It’s almost as if they are an afterthought. Typically, presenters may share everything they know about a product or service but fail miserably when it comes to intentionally addressing the issues or objectives of the audience. The Solution Commit to designing and delivering messaging that follows the adult learning principles. Everyone focuses on the presentation, but the main goal is communication. Stop presenting and begin effectively communicating your ideas to your audience. Why It Works Over the past few decades neuroscience has reached new levels of understanding about the brain and how humans best process information. And while you may think that sharing an abundance of facts will appropriately inform the audience, it is actually the antithesis. Unknowingly, you’re overwhelming them with too much information. Our short-term memories are designed to handle about seven small chunks of information at a time before getting overwhelmed – that’s why most phone numbers are only seven digits long. Simply put, our brains don’t like working too hard to remember large amounts of information all at once, so it’s very important that you understand how to use adult learning principles when designing your sales messages and presentations. These principles will allow you to successfully design messaging that appeals to the human brain and how it processes information. The Cone of Learning Edgar Dale’s Cone of Learning illustrates the importance of incorporating the learning styles into your sales message. Dale’s cone shows the different styles of learning and how much our brains tend to remember with each method. As you can see, the human brain prefers certain methods of learning to others. While you may spend most of your time lecturing, that is considered passive engagement and it is where the human brain processes the least amount of information. Instead, for maximum impact, you should try to spend most of your time engaging all of the senses and employ active learning in your audience. Abandon and Adapt: Putting it all together It’s time we abandon our old methods and adapt a new type of messaging designed to take advantage of the brain’s peak processing power. By creating sales messages and presentations that allow your audience to be active participants (rather than just reading or listening passively), you will be amazed at how often they believe, buy, and bite. So reel ‘em in. And make the catch. ...

Getting Customers To “Believe, Buy, Bite”

“Believe, Buy, Bite.” This mode of thinking has long been a guiding principle for Perspectivity’s efforts to improve the sales and sales messaging of clients. These three B’s are stops along the journey we want all of our prospects to take. We want to craft a credible and believable message that builds rapport with our prospects. We want prospects to buy—obviously—but the process does not end with merely getting them through the sales funnel. Instead of simply enjoying our products and the way we do business, we want them to “take a big bite,” to go forth, and help us to land future prospects via infectious word of mouth. This may sound daunting, but when you look at each step, one by one, it’s pretty straightforward. You must be intensely focused on capturing the attention and understanding of your audience if you want to gain more sales opportunities. That’s the idea, in a nutshell. This is a line from The Ultimate Sales Messaging System, and continues to be a foundational part of how Perspectivity does business. Think of “Believe, Buy, Bite” as a tool to help you accomplish this. Believe means cutting out all the bluster that comes with a lot of sales messaging. Remember, clear, concise, and compelling. Make the audience believe in you and your product’s ability to solve their specific problems. This is where you build trust and rapport with your customer. This requires you to design and deliver your message with a high degree of thoughtfulness and customization. However you like to approach prospects, be it presentations, meetings, etc., tailor your message to the specific people you are talking to on that day. We do not believe in the concept of “one size fits all.” Listen to and understand your individual prospects, and show that you are invested in making them more money and helping solve their problems. Buy comes after you have earned their belief and trust. Making a clear, concise, and compelling case for the prospect will allow them to make an informed purchasing decision. Creating a confident buying environment for the prospect enhances your chance of making the sale. Without that, a prospect will never get any closer to becoming a customer. Bite happens after you’ve made the sale, and only if you’ve taken care to craft the right sales message. When you’ve truly honed your message down to its most effective version, your words will impact your customers to a great enough extent that they will start doing your job for you, helping to bring new customers to you. When this advocacy stage occurs, it means your message has “stuck.” “Bite” is another name for “stickiness.” Like Malcolm Gladwell wrote in his book, The Tipping Point, stickiness is one of the key factors that allow ideas, phenomena, and even brands to take hold and become a trend, a hit, or even an epidemic. When your messaging sticks, customers can’t help but perpetuate it. When you pair that level of messaging with a great product, your customers will swear by it in front of their friends. There it is. Believe, Buy, Bite. As with all of the advice you’ll get from Perspectivity, this approach to making your customer the focal point of your communications is as much about the prospect as it is the seller. Don’t forget the prospect’s point of view when crafting your sales message. Remember, confused prospects rarely buy. Do you have a success story about how you managed to get your customers to “Bite?” Perspectivity would love to hear it! ...